Elective module, MA in Digital Humanities, Maynooth University
Readings

Chen, Anna. “In One’s Own Hand: Seeing Manuscripts in a Digital Age.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 6.2 (2012). Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

 

Cohen, Daniel J. et al. “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History.” The Journal of American History 95.2 (2008). Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Cohen, Daniel J., and Roy Rosenzweig. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Danniau, Fien. “Public History in a Digital Context: Back to the Future or Back to Basics?” BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review 128.4 (2013): 118–144. Print.

 

Gibbs, Fred, and Trevor Owens. “Building Better Digital Humanities Tools: Toward Broader Audiences and User-Centered Designs.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 6.2 (2012). Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

 

Graham, Shawn. “How I Lost the Crowd: A Tale of Sorrow and Hope.” Electric Archaeology. 18 May 2012. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Graham, Shawn, Guy Massie, and Nadine Feuerherm. “The HeritageCrowd Project: A Case Study in Crowdsourcing Public History.” Writing History in the Digital Age. Spring, 2012. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Graham, Shawn, Ian Milligan, and Scott Weingart. The Historian’s Macroscope: Big Digital History – Working Title. Under contract with Imperial College Press, Open Draft Version. 2013.Web. 21 Oct. 2014.

 

Hitchcock, Tim. “Academic History Writing and Its Disconnects.” Journal of Digital Humanities 1.1 (2011). Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Hitchcock, Tim. “Academic History Writing and the Headache of Big Data.” Historyonics. 30 Jan. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.

 

Hitchcock, Tim. “Big Data for Dead People: Digital Readings and the Conundrums of Positivism.” Historyonics. 9 Dec. 2013. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.

 

Hitchcock, Tim. “Confronting the Digital: Or How Academic History Writing Lost the Plot.” Cultural and Social History 10.1 (2013): 9–23. Print.

 

Jeurgens, Charles. “The Scent of the Digital Archive: Dilemmas with Archive Digitisation.” BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review 128.4 (2013): 30–54. Print.

 

Madsen-Brooks, Leslie. “‘I Nevertheless Am a Historian’: Digital Historical Practice and Malpractice around Black Confederate Soldiers.” Writing History in the Digital Age. Spring 2012. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Piersma, Hinke, and Kees Ribbens. “Digital Historical Research.” BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review 128.4 (2013): 78–102. Print.

 

Piersma, Hinke et al. “War in Parliament: What a Digital Approach Can Add to the Study of Parliamentary History.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 8.1 (2014). Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

 

Prescott, Andrew. “The Deceptions of Data.” Digital Riffs: Extemporisations, Excursions and Explorations in the Digital Humanities. 13 Jan. 2013. Web. 9 Oct. 2014.

 

Reed, Ashley. “Managing an Established Digital Humanities Project: Principles and Practices from the Twentieth Year of the William Blake Archive.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 8.1 (2014). Web.

 

Rutner, Jennifer, and Roger C. Schonfeld. Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians. Ithaka S+R, 2012. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Sebouh, David, Aslanian et al. “How Size Matters: The Question of Scale in History.” American Historical Review (2013): 1431 – 1471. Print.

 

Seefeldt, Douglas, and William G. Thomas III. What Is Digital History? A Look at Some Exemplar Projects. University of Nebraska-Lincoln: 2009. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Strange, Carolyn et al. “Mining for the Meanings of a Murder: The Impact of OCR Quality on the Use of Digitized Historical Newspapers.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 8.1 (2014). Web. 31 Oct. 2014.

 

Terras, Melissa. “Melissa Terras’ Blog: DH2010 Plenary: Present, Not Voting: Digital Humanities in the Panopticon.”  10 July 2010. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.

 

Thomas III, William G., and Edward L. Ayers. “The Differences Slavery Made: A Close Analysis of Two American Communities.” American Historical Review 108.5 (2003): 1299–1307. Print and Web.

 

Zaagsma, Gerben. “On Digital History.” BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review 128.4 (2013): 3–29. Print.

 

 

 

 

 

This is not an exhaustive reading list – students are encouraged to read widely around the topics for their individual assessments.